In South Carolina, you can drive 75 miles per hour on interstate highways without getting a speeding ticket. While fast speeds help you reach your destination quickly, they also contribute to serious car accidents. In general terms, the faster your vehicle is traveling, the greater chance you have of damaging a major organ in a sudden crash.

The human body has five major organs. While it is possible to injure any part of your body during a motor vehicle accident, some organs are more vulnerable than others. Here are three major organs that may sustain a life-altering injury in a car accident:

1.Your brain

Your brain is arguably the most important part of you. After all, not only does your brain control essential bodily functions, but it also dictates your personality. If you hit your head during a collision, you may sustain a traumatic brain injury, brain bleed or another type of serious injury. Even if your head does not collide with another object, your brain may hit your skull during the sort of rapid decelerations common in car crashes.

2.Your liver

Your liver is the largest internal organ that you have. While the organ’s mass is essential to performing a variety of necessary processes, it also makes your liver susceptible to injury during an automobile accident. If your midsection hits your seat belt, airbag or steering wheel, you may suffer a liver injury. While some injuries, such as liver bruises, are less serious, others can be deadly.

3.Your heart

Your heart pumps blood through your body. Even though penetrative or blunt-force trauma can cause physical damage to your heart, you must recognize that the organ is vulnerable to stress-related injury. That is, the anxiety you experience during and after a collision may cause you to have a heart attack or another type of dangerous cardiac event.

Even if you drive responsibly, you may not be able to avoid a motor vehicle accident forever. Regrettably, even in comparatively minor crashes, your internal organs may sustain a variety of injuries. By understanding your risk, though, you can likely improve your chances of recovering fully.