Work injuries are not always sudden. Over time, repetitive motion or strain may be responsible for an injury. If your job requires repetitive movement and you believe you have sustained an injury while working, you may be able to receive medical and financial benefits and have a case for workers’ compensation.

One helpful fact you should be aware of is that even if you believe the injury was your fault, it does not make you ineligible for benefits, as long as the injury occurred on the job.

Types of repetitive motion injuries

Jobs that require repeated heavy lifting or extensive typing may put you at a higher risk for repetitive motion injuries. Depending on your duties, there are a variety of injuries that may develop from your work, although certain types of conditions are particularly common:

  • Carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Tendinitis
  • Radial tunnel syndrome
  • Rotator cuff injuries
  • ACL knee injuries
  • Raynaud’s disease

Requirements to qualify for benefits

Make sure your position within the company is an employee role. If you work for a company as an independent contractor, then it is not responsible for providing workers’ compensation. These are the basic standards for eligibility:

  • Gaining your injury through a work activity
  • Precisely following the filing process
  • Having an employer with workers’ compensation insurance

The evidence to support a claim

The insurance company requires substantial proof, such as medical records that demonstrate your medical problem and diagnosis. Consider requesting a written report from your doctor that confirms your injury and work limitations. It is vital to have adequate evidence to support your claim.

The process to file for compensation

Once you have received a medical diagnosis, you need to report your injury to your employer. The employer needs to provide you a workers’ compensation form to fill out, which it then submits to the insurance company. The insurance company performs an investigation, which may include questioning your doctor or requesting you see a doctor of the insurer’s choosing.