During a South Carolina traffic stop, you maintain certain rights. Knowing what these rights are and when to exercise them may work in your favor. The law enforcement officer who stops you may try to get your consent to search your vehicle if he or she suspects something might be amiss. In many cases, you have the right to refuse the search request.

According to FlexYourRights.org, authorities may be able to search your car without a warrant if they have something that counts as probable cause. Probable cause has to be more than a gut feeling; authorities have to have some kind of evidence that something illegal is in the vehicle before they may search your car without your consent or a warrant.

Probable cause examples

If a law enforcement officer sees you or someone else in your vehicle committing a criminal offense, this may constitute probable cause and give the officer the right to search the car. Similarly, if an officer views contraband in the backseat or somewhere else in the vehicle, this may also allow him or her to search the car.

The absence of probable cause

Unless the officer has probable cause, you maintain the right to refuse a search request. If you decide to exercise it, tell the officer you plan to do so while remaining polite and cordial during the interaction. You may also decide to ask the officer if you are free to go. Once you have consent, which should be attainable unless the officer plans to arrest or detain you, you may leave the scene.