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How many drinks does it take to get drunk?

On Behalf of | Jan 11, 2021 | Dui/dwi |

No one ever sets out on an evening of fun with their friends with the intention of getting a DUI. However, that is a very real possibility if you drink too many alcoholic beverages throughout the night.

Each drink you consume increases your blood alcohol concentration (BAC) further. Once you have breached the legal limit, you will be subject to arrest if you are pulled over by law enforcement. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention explains how alcoholic drinks impact BAC, so you can make the right decisions.

What is a standard drink size?

Some alcoholic beverages are more potent than others. That means drink sizes vary depending on the potency of the alcohol being consumed. If you are drinking liquor, the standard drink size is 1.5-ounces, which is commonly referred to as a shot. If you are drinking beer, the standard size is 12-ounces, as most beers are around 5% alcohol. If you are having wine, the standard size is 5-ounces.

In addition to drink size and number of drinks, the effects of alcohol are also based on your height, weight, and gender. For example, a man and woman can drink the same amount of alcohol, but the woman may become inebriated faster due to the size disparity.

How does alcohol affect BAC?

After just two drinks, your BAC will elevate to .02% While well under the legal limit, you may experience impairment of judgement, visual function, and multitasking ability. By four drinks, it is likely that you will have breached the legal limit of 08%. At this point, memory, concentration, and perception are all affected. Another drink and your BAC will be .10%. Slurred speech, cognition, and coordination will be impacted.

Avoiding drunk driving not only prevents legal trouble. It also keeps you and others safe. If you know you will be drinking, consider arranging another way home. Ride-shares save lives, but you can also designate a driver is ride-shares are not available where you live.

 

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