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Does a DUI conviction affect college financial aid?

On Behalf of | Feb 2, 2021 | Dui/dwi |

Paying for college nowadays often requires sticking to a tight budget and looking for all available financial assistance. After all, the average cost of higher education at a public school has increased by nearly 150% over the last 50 years.

You may have heard that a drug-related criminal conviction may result in the suspension of the federal student aid you are currently receiving. Fortunately, an ordinary DUI conviction is not likely to have the same effect on government-backed grants, loans and work-study funds. The other financial aid you receive may be a different story, though.

Completing Your FAFSA

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid gauges your eligibility for federally backed educational financial assistance. When you complete the form, you should answer questions about your finances, criminal history and other matters honestly and completely. You should not encounter any questions on the form about simple drunk driving convictions, however.

Losing private scholarships

Your government-backed financial aid may only be part of your academic financial package. If you receive private scholarships, you must read through the program’s rules and code of conduct to determine how a DUI conviction may affect the private financial aid you receive. Regrettably, if a DUI conviction violates either of these, you may lose your private scholarship money.

Paying higher costs

Your college or university may also initiate academic discipline after a DUI conviction. If the disciplinary board or dean orders you to move out of the dormitory, for example, you may have to pay steep rent for an off-campus apartment.

Ultimately, the higher education costs you must pay after a DUI conviction may make college unaffordable. Mounting a smart and aggressive DUI defense may be your best bet for finishing school without paying even higher costs.

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